4-H Youth Development

4-H Livestock Judging Teaches Life-Skills

Forty-Eight youth participated in the New Mexico State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest. A survey of the participants indicated an increase in knowledge of evaluating market and breeding livestock. More importantly, youth indicated that livestock judging was at least "moderately influential" in decision-making, goal setting, developing organizational skills and teamwork. One participant stated, "It builds self-confidence, improves public speaking, and allows you to meet people." Another participant stated that judging provides, "the ability to work through problems, come to conclusions, and explain why." Livestock judging helps youth develop life-skills to be successful in the future.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Craig Painter, State 4-H Agent


4-H State Shooting Sports Championships

Nearly 300 senior 4-H members gathered at the NRA Whittington Center in Raton to compete in the New Mexico 4-H State Shooting Sports Championships. Through these competitions, youth learned valuable skills including sportsmanship, responsibility and made life-long friendships. A 4-H member that has attended for the past seven years stated, "I have learned more from shooting sports than any other project in 4-H.....it has not only taught me marksmanship, but also how to set goals and be a team player".

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Craig Painter, State 4-H Agent


NM 4-H Food Challenge Teaches Youth Teamwork, Nutrition and Food Safety

Partnerships with New Mexico State Fair, NMDA, HRTM and Department of FCS provided a new avenue to engage youth in food related education and career prep through the NM 4-H Food Challenge. One 4-H'er shared her experience stating, "I was excited about this event because it was a chance for me to experiment with my cooking skills. Our team had practiced and prepared and spent a lot of time going over food safety, we won the 'Mr. Clean' award and first in our age group." This event builds on experiential learning experiences to teach valuable life skills to NM youth.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Mindy Turner, Extension 4-H/Youth Specialist


NM 4-H Home Economics School engages teenagers in leadership roles.

Teen 4-H members provide instruction to younger members during the NM 4-H Home Ec School. This opportunity to "learn by doing" provides positive interactions for teens. One participant stated, "None of my 4-H experiences compare to the opportunities I have had this year to influence the younger kids by serving as a Junior Instructor." Another shares, "By participating in leadership activities, such as being a Junior Instructor at Home Ec School, I improved my leadership and communication skills as an individual and as a team member."

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Mindy Turner, Extension 4-H/Youth Specialist


Enhancing Public Education through the Extension and Research Youth Agricultural Science Center.

The NMSU Extension and Research Youth Agricultural Science Center enhances educational opportunities for youth in agricultural science and related STEM programs, agricultural literacy, and the production of fresh and nutritious food. The Center delivers high value programs at a low cost to about 750 youth annually. The youth exposed to the Center model score significantly higher in agriscience and have significantly higher science scores on State mandated assessments. Indirectly, the community benefits from a more educated populace, access to fresh food that improves quality of life, and a community space for non-formal agricultural innovation demonstrations.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Peter Skelton, Associate Professor & Director

Innovative Media Research and Extension

Learning Games Lab

Learning Games Lab faculty conduct research-based design to inform development of learning tools. In 2017, the lab hosted 60 youth over several sessions. These "youth consultants" tested games for the Math Snacks suite; animations and interactives for several projects on water, food safety and chemistry; and the newest app from Facebook, Messenger Kids. Youth consultants develop their media literacy skills while providing feedback on usability, content, and appeal of the tools. NMSU's Games Lab researchers help Facebook developers identify desires of children when online, such as ways to be polite, and ways to build social skills through digital communication.

Pillar:
Foundational Education and Training
• Dr. Barbara Chamberlin, Instructional Designer & Asst. Department Head


Grant Writing Training

Building strong grant writing skills in faculty and students helps ACES secure vital financial resources to serve our educational, research and Extension missions. In 2017, we trained 75 faculty and graduate students in the basics of writing fundable proposals. A post-retroactive evaluation indicated that 79% of participants increased their understanding that successful grant writing will increase their likelihood of positive career outcomes; 85% reported increased proposal writing skills; and 97% reported increased knowledge of how to increase the probability their proposal would be funded.

Pillar:
Foundational Education and Training
• Dr. Wendy Hamilton, Extension Program Specialist


Understanding Western Soils: Educational Animations & Videos

"Understanding Western Soils" focuses on key soil properties and techniques for sampling and testing arid western soils. These fifteen videos highlight topics of concern to Western producers, such as the Olsen P test, Sodium Adsorption Ratio, saturated paste, and soil texture/water-holding capacity. High-contrast animation clarifies how salts compete with plants for water. In a survey of 90 viewers (including producers, students, and teachers), 40% reported a 25-50% knowledge increase and 60% a 75-100% knowledge increase, on a given topic. Viewed more than 32,000 times, shared more than 500 times, these videos have received 297 "likes" at YouTube.

Pillar:
Water Use and Conservation
• Dr. Jeanne Gleason, Innovative Media Research & Extension Department Head

Extension Family and Consumer Sciences

Community-based intervention helps New Mexicans living with chronic conditions manage and improve their health.

With $184,050 in funding (2016 - present), NMSU Extension is subcontracted through the NM Department of Health to engage in statewide efforts to increase the participation in, access to, reach and effectiveness of evidence-based English and Spanish Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs for adults of all ages with diabetes and related chronic health conditions, including those with disabilities. Primarily serving southern NM, community workshops have reached close to 125 participants from six counties and trained 37 individuals enabling them to offer local workshops with support from NMSU Extension.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Sonja Koukel, Extension Community & Environmental Health Specialist


Stress management and resiliency programs help employees, community, athletes, and students across New Mexico.

Stress is associated with chronic disease, poor quality of life, and increased risk of health issues. A program on Managing Stress and Building Resiliency was developed by NSMU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences and delivered to nearly 1,000 people across the state, including employees of the state, middle-school to college level students, collegiate athletes, and community members. Participants in the program demonstrated increases in knowledge, skills, and motivation to better handle stress and engage in practices that enhance resiliency. This program has the potential to improve health-related risks due to stress and enhance the quality of life of New Mexicans.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Raquel Garzon, Extension Nutrition and Wellness Specialist


Student research result in the development of new value-added food products.

Since 2015, The "Martin Steinman Endowed Professorship in Food Science and Technology" has supported 11 undergraduate students working on Extension Food Technology value-added research projects ranging from jerky, artisan cheese and chile processing while utilizing specialized equipment (extruder, spray drier, pasteurizer, freeze drier) for new food product development with glandless cottonseed meal and jujube fruit. These "Steinman Fellow" students successfully completed their degree programs, presented their research projects at a professional meeting, participated in an external internship, joined the food industry or advanced their education. This program develops confident, skilled professionals who are in demand by the food industry.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Nancy Flores, Extension Food and Technology Specialist


New program on eliminating debt helps New Mexican's get a handle on their finances.

The number one cause of financial stress in New Mexico is debt. With the third-highest unemployment rate in the nation, residents might rely on credit, leading to increased levels of debt. New Mexico State University's debt elimination program focuses on helping individuals and families understand their spending, stop going deeper in debt, and begin the process of eliminating their debt. Impacts show that 100% of participants improved their knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding debt elimination, 93% intended to pay off their debt as soon as possible, and 93% planned to create a debt-elimination plan to accelerate paying off their debt.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Bryce Jorgensen, Extension Personal and Family Finance Specialist


After a year-long hiatus The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) will be brought back to NMSU Extension in 2018.

Extension is beginning the implementation of NDPP in three counties. Having received Pending Recognition from the Center for Disease Control & Prevention, Extension will begin the process of monitoring participants weight loss by tracking food intake and participation in physical activity. Research shows that people with prediabetes who take part in a structured lifestyle change program, like NDPP, can cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58%. With additional funding from Health Insight, Inc., Extension will be able to play a large role in creating future sustainability for NDPP, while forging statewide reach.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Lucinda Banegas, Extension Associate II


NMSU is one of 90 universities participating in Fruved, a USDA approved joint research project focused on helping students manage their weight and live healthier lives.

The project is focused on three areas: improving dietary intake, increasing physical activity, and improving overall stress management skills. Healthy Halls Week, a collaboration with Student Housing, have students fill out the national survey while enjoying a healthy breakfast on their way to class. On campus audits were performed at dining facilities and a recreational facility to analyze nutrition and physical activity. Of the surveys completed, 74% found it very important/important to provide healthier food options and indicated that the university should offer an incentive program to encourage students' healthy behaviors. University of Tennessee is analyzing the national data.
A write up of the collaboration with the healthy halls event is at: https://newscenter.nmsu.edu/Articles/view/12877/nmsu-extension-faculty-participating-in-nationwide-student-health-research

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Lourdes Olivas, Extension Associate II


Kitchen Creations: a cooking school for people with diabetes and their families.

The Center for Disease Control estimates 10.5% of adults in New Mexico have been diagnosed with diabetes. A study in Diabetes Care estimated diabetes/prediabetes costs the state about $2 billion annually. Extension has partnered with the NM Department of Health and 21 other organizations to provide 29 Kitchen Creations cooking schools. Participants learned how to plan meals that manage carbohydrates and promote heart health. 470 adults have participated in the cooking schools, with all participants reporting they understand the strategies to plan/prepare healthy meals and 79% reporting they were following three or more of the recommended eating practices.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Cassandra Vanderpool, MS, RDN, LD, Extension Diabetes Coordinator


Ideas for Cooking and Nutrition (ICAN) brings healthy eating and a local foods focus to limited-resource populations across New Mexico.

Reaching over 80,000 families every year, ICAN provides face-to-face nutrition education in low-income communities where the average family of four lives on $237 a week. Operating statewide as part of NMSU Extension, ICAN also fosters the development of community gardens, school salad bars, and other healthy lifestyle initiatives. Partnering with farmers markets allows ICAN to teach participants how to buy locally grown produce. ICAN works to improve New Mexico's quality of life and reduce future healthcare costs associated with obesity, and 84% of participants eat healthier after taking ICAN classes. ICAN is funded by the USDA's SNAP-Ed and EFNEP grants.

Pillar:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Donna Sauter, MS, RDN, ICAN Program Director

Extension Animal Science and Natural Resources

County Equine Expos' youth and adult participants' passion promotes healthy living and sustainable future for the $750 million equine industry in New Mexico.

Since 2008, several setbacks have contributed to the decline in number of participants in the once vibrant New Mexico equine industry. The Expos seek to provide SAFE horsemanship instruction along with education on equine management in a FUN environment that encourages novice and intermediate riders to develop their skills and continue their pursuit of healthful equestrian activities. These events, held in rural areas to provide access to underserved audiences, also bring "new" revenue to community businesses.

Pillars:
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Jason L. Turner, Extension Horse Specialist


Harnessing Fire - Training private landowners how to use prescribed fire to reduce wildfire hazards and increase watershed health.

A century of fire exclusion has negatively impacted NM's forests and watersheds. Large and severe wildfires are threatening lives, property, wildlife habitat, watersheds, and forests. Prescribed burning is a tool that can be used to mitigate negative impacts of wildfire. NMSU Cooperative Extension Service is training the next generation of landowners on the safe and effective use of prescribed fire. Over the course of three years, 500 acres have been burned by private landowner participants. 87% of participants showed improved knowledge and skillset, and 93% indicated they intended to pursue additional burning opportunities on their own land.

Pillars:
Environmental Stewardship
Water Use and Conservation
• Dr. Douglas Cram, Extension Forestry and Fire Specialist


NMSU ACES High Certified Calf Program

Sales of cows and calves are New Mexico's second leading agricultural commodity. Market trends suggest continued pressure on cattle prices in the coming years. To assist, CES created the ACES High certified calf program which acts as a third party verification of vaccination and weaning programs. Nearly 1000 calves were initially enrolled in the program and 468 calves participated in the NMSU ACES High + certified sale. Collectively, participation in the program generated nearly $34,700 in additional revenue for ACES High + calves compared with calves that had no verification of vaccination or weaning program.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Craig Gifford, Extension Beef Cattle Specialist


The U.S. Dairy Education & Training Consortium - teaching and training the next generation of dairy professionals.

Despite declining resources to teach young dairy professionals modern dairy management, NMSU Dairy Extension leads a consortium of universities to provide practical dairy teaching in a 6-week intensive summer program. Total reach in 10-yrs.: 427 students from 48 universities. Impact: 4 out of 5 students employed in agriculture, 2 out of 3 students employed in dairy industry, 1 out of 3 students working on/managing a dairy. Program received 2017 Dairy Sustainability Award in Community Partnerships.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Water Use and Conservation
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Robert Hagevoort, Extension Dairy Specialist


The U.S. Dairy Education & Training Consortium - development, evaluation and implementation of a dairy safety awareness program.

Goal: develop effective training tools appropriate for a predominantly Hispanic, literacy challenged dairy workforce. Individual, interactive safety awareness training delivered via m-learning to approximately 2,000 individuals on 60 dairies in 8 states. Effectiveness evaluation indicates appropriateness of delivery method and significant improvement of both comprehension and retention. Expectation: improved safety awareness among dairy workers. Impact: regional program adaptation and implementation by dairy associations and cooperatives. Assessing appropriateness for national program implementation, the creation of industry advisory board, and establishment of a certificate program.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Robert Hagevoort, Extension Dairy Specialist


Maximizing voluntary compliance in antimicrobial stewardship programs: a critical factor for effective intervention.

As part of the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria aimed at better surveillance of antimicrobial resistance, better diagnostic testing, and the development of new vaccines and antibiotics, NMSU Dairy Extension is collaborating with several partners in a large research project with the goal to evaluate current antimicrobial protocols to determine if being more cautious than manufacturer's labels require aids in gaining ground on antimicrobial resistance. Outcomes may lead to the development of additional protocols and decision making tools to further antimicrobial stewardship programs for producers.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Robert Hagevoort, Extension Dairy Specialist


Sustainable management of aquatic resources

Water is one of the most important natural resources in New Mexico, and is particularly vulnerable to degradation because if its scarcity. Water quality is essential for human, ecosystem and economic health. Understanding the importance of healthy aquatic ecosystems and of management practices that protect watersheds and water quality is critical. Extension programming targeting a diverse audience, including children, Master Gardeners, and Pesticide applicators has increased knowledge of the importance of water quality. 78% of participants showed improved knowledge, 94% changed their attitudes toward how their practices impact water quality, and 74% indicated a desire to change a current practice.

Pillars:
Environmental Stewardship
Water Use and Conservation
• Dr. Rossana Sallenave, Extension Aquatic Ecology Specialist


New Mexico State University, Cooperative Extension Service educates New Mexicans on integrated wildlife damage management techniques to protect agriculture production, property, municipalities, human health and safety.

Although New Mexican's greatly enjoy their wildlife, at times wildlife create human health and safety concerns and damage property. Annually, wildlife is responsible for greater than $1 billion in agricultural production losses and $25 billion in losses to homes, businesses and municipalities, nationwide. New Mexico State University, Cooperative Extension Service trains urban and rural New Mexicans to safely and effectively address wildlife damage issues in their homes, ranches, farms and communities using environmentally responsible methods. Impacts show 94% of participants improved their knowledge of integrated wildlife damage management and 82% would use knowledge gained.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Environmental Stewardship
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
• Dr. Samuel T. Smallidge, Extension Wildlife Specialist


Livestock Disease and Veterinary Care- Beef Quality Assurance

This program is a product of the National Cattleman's Beef Association and was designed as a producer education program delivered by Extension. The program mission statement: "to maximize consumer confidence in, and acceptance of, beef by focusing the producers attention to daily production practices that influence the safety, wholesomeness and quality of beef and beef products through the use of science, research and educational initiatives" The number of NM beef producers trained and certified in 2017 was 313 producers with many Native American and Hispanic producers being leaders in the certification process in their communities.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. John C Wenzel DVM, Extension Veterinarian


Livestock Disease and Veterinary Care- NM-ALIRT

This is a state-wide network of veterinarians who are equipped and trained to respond to large or suspicious livestock losses in New Mexico. This program is designed to provide a first line of defense against disease or terrorism incidents that may threaten the New Mexico livestock industry. Participating veterinarians report monthly on disease syndromes that allow for earlier detection of disease trends or outbreaks. This program has expanded to include Arizona veterinarians creating a more regional response to livestock loss. This program has responded to approximately 30 livestock loss situations since its inception in 2006.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. John C Wenzel DVM, Extension Veterinarian


Livestock Disease and Veterinary Care- Rural Veterinary Relief Program

New Mexico Rural Veterinary Practice Relief Program works with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education's Professional Student Exchange Program to fill the need of veterinarians in rural NM. New Mexico does not have College of Veterinary Medicine, however our students need to have an opportunity to receive a veterinary medical education. We are involved in the Veterinary Medical admissions process used by participating Colleges of Veterinary Medicine. This allows for NM to have input on returning graduate veterinarians who are NM residents and the ability to provide for specific needs in NM and financial relief for NM applicants.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. John C Wenzel DVM, Extension Veterinarian


Livestock Disease and Veterinary Care- Trichomoniasis Control Program

Trichomoniasis became a reportable disease in 2005 due to positive tests in north - central New Mexico and upon further investigation it was revealed that the disease was present over a large portion of NM. In 2005, the incidence of Trichomoniasis was 6.5%. State animal health officials began a disease control program to limit the spread of the disease. Extension leads a producer education program as the cornerstone of a Trichomoniasis control program. Educational programs have been held all over New Mexico and in 2017 the number of Trichomoniasis positive bulls was reduced to 1.5% in over 16,000 tested bulls.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. John C Wenzel DVM, Extension Veterinarian


Livestock Disease and Veterinary Care- US Beef Academy

The United States Beef Academy (USBA) is an educational event for young men and women who are motivated to learn about the beef industry. It is a five day, intensive educational opportunity and focuses on current methods and technology used in beef production. Each day of the Academy focuses on a different scientific area of beef production. This event is under the direction of New Mexico State University Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, Texas Agri-Life Extension, and Colorado State University. The last two years we have had students from nine states and Mexico.

Pillar:
Foundational Education and Training
• Dr. John C Wenzel DVM, Extension Veterinarian


New Mexico's socioeconomic health depends upon good condition rangeland

New Mexico's socioeconomic health depends upon good condition rangeland because most of NM is rangeland. Rangelands with desired plants provide land-based goods and services including food, fiber, wildlife, recreation, tourism, oil and gas, mineral extraction, and revenue from land taxes, permits, and easements. Invasive plants have degraded millions of NM acres and their ability to provide critical goods and services. The rangeland brush and weed management program in 2017 taught 500 people during 18 presentations across NM how to control invasive plants to improve rangelands. This program worked with 16 entities including multiple departments, universities, agencies, tribes, and private companies.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Kert Young, Extension Brush & Weed Specialist

Extension Plant Sciences

NMSU Brings Continued Education Trainings to Pesticide Applicators in New Mexico.

In NM, licensed applicators must receive continuing education credits annually. The NMSU pesticide applicators training programs help to provide this continuing education. In 2017, out of 431 attendees, 97% indicated they learned something to help with applications, and 78% indicated that they will change application practices based on information provided in the training. Based on information provided in my Water Hardness training, the San Juan County Soil and Water Conservation District had water sources tested for hardness levels. Letters describing the results were then distributed to landscape management companies and applicators offering suggestions for improved weed management in Farmington.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Leslie Beck, Extension Weed Specialist


NMSU Researchers Provide Management Options for Difficult-to-Control Weeds in Alfalfa.

As of 2016, alfalfa hay remains the most valuable cash crop in New Mexico with an estimated annual gross of $158 million. Additionally, the forage industry directly influences the success of the livestock and dairy industries. Infestations of late-season perennial weeds that are extremely difficult-to-control with current management options can lower forage quality and yield, increase incidence of disease and insect damage, and create detrimental harvesting issues. New Mexico State University researchers are currently evaluating various herbicides and combinations of active ingredients to help growers better manage difficult-to-control weeds like broadleaf and buckhorn plantain in alfalfa.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Leslie Beck, Extension Weed Specialist


Improved Adoption of Integrated Pest Management Results in Environmental Benefits to New Mexico.

The IPM program at New Mexico State University reached over 10,000 stakeholders in 2017, educating growers, land managers and homeowners on the principles of IPM and habitat management for beneficial insects. Impacts showed approximately 66% of stakeholders were currently implementing an IPM practice, while 94% indicated they learned a new IPM tactic they could apply to their system. When stakeholders were asked whether they were actively practicing beneficial insect conservation only 62% indicated yes, while 92% indicated their level of understanding improved in the area of IPM and pollinator conservation.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Ashley Bennett, Extension Urban & Small Farms IPM Specialist


Landscape Design and Habitat Management

Landscape Design and Habitat Management Improves Pollinator Conservation and Ecosystem Services to Urban and Agricultural Areas. The United States grows over 100 pollinator dependent crops, and native bees provide about $3 billion in free pollination services to U.S. agriculture. The cost of using managed bees to provide pollination services to US crops is about $655.6 million. Unfortunately, wild bee abundance is declining across the U.S. with a 23% decline from 2008-2013. New Mexico State University's IPM program is focused on research that will increase native pollinators in urban and agricultural landscapes through improved landscape design and restoration strategies. Reduced reliance on a single pollinator will increase the resilience of US agriculture while benefiting pollinator conservation.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Ashley Bennett, Extension Urban & Small Farms IPM Specialist


Nutrient Management.

New Mexico's 325,000 dairy cows produce ~6.825 million tons of manure. Most is land applied along with wastewater. New Mexico's Water Quality Commission requires groundwater monitoring. However, ~two-thirds of all groundwater-monitoring wells near dairies exceed state the state standard of 10 ppm NO3-N. Exceedances must be treated as mandated by the Groundwater Protection Act. Anion exchange remediation treatments cost $32,000 per acre-inch of water. Yearly water treatment for a 2000 head dairy would approach 112AF/year ($43M per year). Our soil test software optimizes nutrient rates from various sources to reduce potential nitrogen contamination and avoid extreme remediation expenses.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Robert Flynn, Extension Agronomist


Appropriate Analyses for Soil and Water

There are numerous soil and water testing laboratories for homeowners and farmers in the U.S. Not all analyses reflect specific issues found in New Mexico soil and water. The westernsoil.nmsu.edu website and NMSU YouTube channel houses videos that explain why specific procedures are needed when submitting soil and water samples. The difference is critical as it gives growers a starting point for making management decisions. Clients apply what is needed to have better crops and often save money in the process. There have been over 10,556 views of the videos over a 10-month period in 2017.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Robert Flynn, Extension Agronomist


Pesticide Safety Education Program.

The Pesticide Safety Education Program at NMSU promotes the responsible use of pesticides through educational resources and training. Training covers a broad range of topics on human safety and environmental issues. The program reaches over 500 individuals annually. Workshop evaluations indicate that 97% of participants learned a new skill that will assist them when applying pesticides, and 75% of participants learned a new pest or plant management practice that will decrease pesticide applications. Recertifying 350 current pesticide applicators and training 150 new license holders with an average annual salary of $34,570, this program contributed over $17,000,000 to New Mexico's economy.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Jason French, Extension Plant Diagnostician and Pesticide Program Manager


Surround crop protectant spray may help New Mexico winegrowers mitigate spring frost damage.

Every vintage is different, but "late" frosts that occur after grapes have budded out are a consistent threat across New Mexico each spring. Sometimes, only a week or matter of days is the difference between a full crop, a partial crop or complete loss. New Mexico State University State Researchers are testing a kaolin clay material, for its ability to reduce temperatures of dormant buds. This temperature reduction could slow bud development and consequently delay vulnerable green growth until after the threat of damaging frost has passed.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Gill Giese, Extension Viticulture Specialist


Springtime freeze injury avoidance in pecan orchard using dormant-season kaolin clay sprays.

With the recent high prices for pecans, there has been increased interest in planting pecan orchards in colder-climate areas of New Mexico where there is an elevated risk for springtime freeze injury. When pecan trees are subjected to freezing temperatures after bud-break there is often total crop loss, costing the grower as much as $5,000/acre in potential gross profits. NMSU researchers are studying the possible use of white kaolin clay sprays to cool dormant bud tissues, thereby delaying bud-break and reducing risk for freeze injury. This represents a cheaper option for mitigating freeze injury risks than installation of wind-machines.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Richard Heerema, Extension Pecan Specialist


Inter-Regional Research Project #4 (IR-4) at NMSU

IR-4 is vital for U.S. food security infrastructure, and for combating bioterrorism and invasive species. The IR-4 Project at NMSU conducts on average 12 trials per season in NM. Of the 150 new tolerances established in 2016, nearly 80 were crop group tolerances, supporting registrations on numerous crops.  IR-4 has supported over 48,000 registrations of conventional and reduced-risk pesticides on food crops for the past 53-years. IR-4 focuses on technology compatible with integrated pest management systems.  A 2012 economic analysis documented that IR-4 contributes $7.8 billion dollars annually to the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and supports over 100,000 jobs.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Cary Hamilton, IR-4 Program Manager


Enhancing income from cotton in New Mexico.

About 80% of cotton growers reached through the extension program are willing to grow glandless cotton if the demand for glandless cottonseeds emerges and over 90% of the growers surveyed demonstrated sufficient knowledge of the cultural practices and management required to grow glandless cotton. This has led to an average of 100 ac of glandless cotton production in New Mexico since 2015. Farmers who grow glandless cotton in New Mexico have been receiving $800 per ton for the cottonseeds of the glandless varieties in contrast to $250 per ton for the cottonseeds of the conventional varieties.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. John Idowu, Extension Agronomist


Subsurface Irrigation Reduces Water Needed for Urban Turfgrass Areas.

Turfgrass represents the largest irrigated crop in the US and plays important economic and ecological roles in urban environments. To reduce irrigation water needed for public parks, the Turfgrass Research and Extension program works with the City of Albuquerque to compare water use in a park half irrigated with subsurface drip, half with standard sprinklers. First year data indicated that the drip irrigated parks used 30% less water, with no drop in visual appearance. The City hopes to install subsurface systems in other parks in 3 to 5 years, which could save up to $1 Million annually in water costs.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Bernd Leinauer, Extension Turf Specialist


Improving On-Farm Efficiencies in Forage Systems Could Have Significant Impacts Statewide.

New Mexico produces over 1.2 million tons of hay on over 300,000 acres, and 2.4 million tons of silage on approximately 100,000 acres. Value of these combined forage industries is greater than $365M/year. Improved farm efficiencies of 25% or more have been shown, through research, to result from selecting proper crop species and variety, fertilizer and seed inputs, and improved water management strategies. These improvements can result in as much as $100/acre savings to forage producers, with an overall potential impact exceeding $35M in the state of NM.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Mark Marsalis, Extension Agronomist


Importance of Crop Variety Testing in New Mexico.

Crop variety testing is an important statewide program in New Mexico. Crops tested include alfalfa, corn, sorghum, wheat, and cotton. University variety trials have shown that there is an average 25% higher yield associated with improved varieties, which translates into as much as $115M additional annual earnings statewide if superior crop varieties are selected over the trial mean.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Mark Marsalis, Extension Agronomist


Biological Control of Insect Pests in Key New Mexico Crops.

Biological Control has the potential to control many insect pests but is frequently undervalued. Control of insect eggs alone is often 80-90% when populations of predators are not disrupted by frequent insecticide applications. Control of alfalfa weevil with parasitoids and predators will save New Mexico growers over $2Million per year. Our NMSU farm has maintained good control of alfalfa weevil with biological control for 20 years. Replicating this type of control in just alfalfa, sorghum and pecan will save growers $6.5 Million per year in reduced losses and control costs.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Jane Pierce, Extension Entomologist


Sugarcane Aphid Pest Management in Sorghum.

A sugarcane aphid management program is being developed based on biological control, cultural controls and host plant resistance. Implementation will save growers in New Mexico $4.6 Million per year in reduced costs and losses as well as $20 Million in adjacent Texas counties.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Jane Pierce, Extension Entomologist


New chemical management practices help in turfgrass water conservation.

The limitations of using potable water for turfgrass irrigation in arid and semi-arid areas of the US have become increasingly apparent and strategies that help in water conservation have to be investigated. New Mexico State University's turfgrass researchers study the possibility of using chemical products to maintain acceptable turf quality under reduced irrigation. These products include surfactants, plant growth regulators, and products that activate the plant's defense system by affecting stomata conductance. Research has been conducted to compare these products against an untreated control at varying drought levels to quantify their irrigation conservation potential.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Elena Sevostianova, College Assistant Professor


Things That Bug Us: Weeds & Insects!, AgVentures for Elementary Students, 2017.

AgVentures provided age appropriate lessons about agriculture for elementary students with little or no understanding of its importance to them or our state's economy. NMSU Entomologist Carol Sutherland presented specimen displays and brief, interactive presentations about beneficial and destructive insects found in gardens, fields, homes and kitchens to over 250 students and adults. Teachers expressed appreciation for this educational enhancement opportunity, scoring AgVentures very highly for organization and educational usefulness. Paired with 'Weeds...' teachers awarded 'Things That Bug Us' 5/5 points for individual presentations that sparked student enthusiasm and long-lasting class discussions.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Carol Sutherland, Extension Entomologist


Values Associated with Pesticide Applicator Training in New Mexico.

Pesticides and pesticide applicators are regulated by state and federal agencies. In New Mexico, current licenses are required for those who recommend or apply pesticides to public or private property and for purchase or use of "restricted" products. Extension specialists remind attendees at annual training events of the importance of equipment calibration and requirements for personal safety, environmental protection and legal implications of pesticide labels. Licensee benefits (97% of 431 attendees in 2017) included improved equipment skills, increased use of personal protective equipment and safer practices, reduced costs and "down-time" and improved understanding of product enhancements and modes of action.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Carol Sutherland, Extension Entomologist


Southwest Yard & Garden Weekly Newspaper Column.

The Southwest Yard & Garden column has been published for over 28 years by the NMSU Extension Horticulturalists. Since I started in August 2017, circulation increased by 47% to 387,117. If 10% of the increased readership invested a conservative estimate of $25 per landscape tree in response to the column, this would result in $309,565 in additional sales. The International Society of Arboriculture states that there is a $4 return for every $1 invested in public tree planting and care. Consequently, the potential impact could be a $1.2 million net increase in benefits to the state of New Mexico.

Pillar:
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Marisa Thompson, Extension Urban Horticulture Specialist


Vegetable Production Extension Programming:

Participants in vegetable trainings reported an increase in vegetable production knowledge, with an average of 71% reporting a large increase in know-how. An average of 87% of respondents were inspired to grow more vegetables. Information provided on growing tomatoes motivated an increase in local production by 5,250 lbs in Bernalillo County; 1,980 lbs in Sandoval, 1,860 lbs in Taos,1,110 lbs in Chaves,1,830 lbs in Grants, 1,650 lbs in Los Alamos, and 4,290 lbs in Valencia Counties. Overall, only counting surveyed counties, the vegetable production training will result in 17,970 additional pounds of locally grown tomatoes in the state.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Stephanie Walker, Extension Vegetable Specialist


Chile Mechanical Harvesting.

New Mexico green chile is harvested by hand. Mechanizing chile harvest is key to reversing the loss of production acreage in state. Along with breeding NM green chile cultivars efficient for mechanization, research has also been conducted to identify optimum equipment and production protocols. Success in these efforts is expected to spur mechanization of NM green chile and reverse the decline of chile acreage in the state. If only 10 % of green chile acreage lost since peak production is regained as a result of mechanization, the state will realize approximately 19 million dollars of additional crop receipts per year.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Stephanie Walker, Extension Vegetable Specialist


The limited choices of commercially available cultivars to the jujube industry will be greatly improved with the NMSU jujube project.

There are currently only 5-6 jujube cultivars commercially available in the United States with Li as the dominant one. The New Mexico State Alcalde Center jujube program has been evaluating more than 50 cultivars in the past 8 years and have identified 8-10 fresh eating cultivars. Those cultivars will give growers nationwide more choices with extended maturation dates and achieve $1-2 more premium per pound. The jujube acreage nationwide will increase significantly.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Shengrui Yao, Extension Fruit Specialist


A new fruit crop-jujube is gradually adopted in New Mexico.

The fruit industry in New Mexico is threatened by late frost each year. Jujube can avoid late frosts and produce a reliable crop annually. With annual workshops, field days, and numerous media coverages and promotion, hundreds of home gardeners have planted jujubes in their backyards and over ten fruit growers start to plant them commercially in New Mexico.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Shengrui Yao, Extension Fruit Specialist


Extension Master Gardener Program.

In 2017 Master Gardeners provided current, research-based education to the public using collaborative hands-on projects such as Sandoval County's Seed2Need. Students contributed 2882 hours participating in 14 events beginning with garden preparation and planting, ending in crop management and harvest. Education in use, quality and conservation of water, land stewardship through the building of healthy soil, and minimizing NM's food deserts by growing food and sharing it with others was the goal. 2017 grew and harvested 61,678 pounds of produce donating it to food pantries serving an average of 70,000 New Mexicans each week who otherwise would go hungry.

Pillar:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
• Kelly White, Master Gardener Program Coordinator

Extension Economics

Beginning Farmers and Ranchers in New Mexico's Pueblos

Agriculture has played an important role in the survival of the Pueblo People of New Mexico within the past eight hundred years and greatly contributes to their custom, culture and tradition. Today, their custom, culture, traditions and economic stability are threatened by lack of agricultural technical and educational assistance. CES RAIPAP specialists through the assistance of the USDA NIFA BFRDP, have trained over 160 Native American beginning farmers and ranchers within the northern and southern pueblos, thus increasing farm income and maintaining cultural values and tradition.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Environmental Stewardship
• Edmund Gomez, Assistant Department Head & Project Director


Sustainable Farming Techniques in Northern New Mexico

Success in utilizing sustainable farming techniques in northern New Mexico is challenging due to many obstacles, including a short growing season. Greenhouse construction is very expensive and many small scale farmers cannot afford to invest due to these prohibitive costs. The use of hoop houses or high tunnels has been demonstrated to be cost effective for small scale farmers and can provide extended growing season for various high value cash crops. CES RAIPAP specialists have assisted over 1400 New Mexico producers in building high tunnel/hoop house units and by extending the growing season, thus improving annual income through additional crop production.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Environmental Stewardship
• Del Jimenez, Agricultural Specialist


Stronger Economies Together (SET)

SET is a USDA Rural Development program in partnership with the nation's Land Grant Institutions. The SET program seeks to address the economic development challenges that rural communities and areas face today by encouraging, facilitating and supporting efforts to design and implement multi-county economic development plans and projects that strategically build on the current and emerging economic strengths of that region. New Mexico State University has facilitated the establishment of nine SET regions involving 32 of the state's 33 counties.

Pillars:
Food & Fiber Production and Marketing
Water Use and Conservation
Family Development and Health of New Mexicans
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Michael Patrick, Associate Professor, Extension. Specialist/Economic Dev. Coordinator


Resiliency in New Mexico Agriculture

New Mexico agriculture and food industries face many challenges and are looking to the future. New Mexico State University's Resiliency in New Mexico Agriculture project, in collaboration with agriculture and food interests across the state, seeks to develop a strategic plan for a resilient and diversified agricultural system that will exhibit both a strong and growing export-oriented commodity agriculture sector and a robust system of small to medium-sized family farms and ranches to meet the growing consumer demand for locally produced food.

Pillar:
Food & Fiber Production and Marketing
• Dr. Michael Patrick, Associate Professor, Extension. Specialist/Economic Dev. Coordinator


Organic Transition: Improving the Competitiveness of Limited Resource Farmers and Ranchers in Southern New Mexico Through the Adoption of Organic Practices

USDA AFRI Organic Transition Grant: Improving the Competitiveness of Limited Resource Farmers and Ranchers (LRFR) in Southern New Mexico Through the Adoption of Organic Practices. The goal of this project is to improve the competiveness of Limited Resource Farmers and Ranchers (LRFR) in Southern New Mexico through the successful adoption of organic farming and ranching practices. Over the course of the three-year project, the Organic Transition Team (OTT) and project reached an estimated 850 producers, local municipality's, and local and state government agency with information and education material pertaining to Organic Farming and Ranching best practices, and certification requirements.

Pillars:
Food and Fiber Production and Marketing
Environmental Stewardship
• Dr. Paul Gutierrez, Extension Specialist